Built in 1929 in Greensboro, North Carolina, the Julian Price home had seen better days. The 31-room estate had been neglected over the years, with the exterior hardly visible from the street. The home has since turned to new owners, and after a major clean-up effort + renovation inside and out, the home has been taken back to its original beauty. In partnership with Preservation Greensboro, the Julian Price Show Home is now on display throughout the month of April for tours. Various local designers from the North Carolina area have outfitted all the rooms in the home – included in that roster is the Design Crew from west elm Greensboro.

Lead Stylist with west elm Greensboro‘s Design Crew, Andrew Webb, along with Shopkeeper Michael Wimbs, designed the third-floor attic space of the Show House, transforming the 325 sq. foot narrow space into a large office with multiple seating areas + reading nooks.

“To me, being a designer is being a problem-solver,” mentions Andrew. “I always love getting to know a client and figuring out the problems they’re trying to overcome. With this attic office, space was the biggest concern, so using pieces that weren’t oversized, and could also do double duty, were key components. west elm’s Mid-Century Collection works beautifully for smaller spaces, using pieces from that collection provided functional furniture without the bulk. With that foundation, it was all about finding ways to layer color and texture into the space without it feeling too full or overdone.”

The team went with Snowbound by Sherwin Williams for the wall color. It has some warmth to it, while not being too yellow or creamy in tone. As for the rest of the color palette in the space, Andrew goes on to say, “I was inspired by colors and silhouettes of the 60’s + 70’s. Because the attic is level with the surrounding tree canopy, you see tons of greenery; pulling in those retro vibes with yellow-greens, warm woods, and brass details accented what’s occurring naturally outside. It’s a fun yet refreshing space.”

Included in the attic space + bathroom, are prints that not only aesthetically mirror the color palette, but also have a direct tie to the history of the home. “I’m a big fan of a well-curated gallery wall; but after installing a mix of wood and metal frames, I felt like the space was still missing something. With research, I ended up tracking down historic images relating to the house – photographs of previous owners (including Julian Price himself), past designers, exterior images, and even photos taken in the 1970’s of a previous designer showcase,” says Andrew.

“I dusted off my graphic design skills, editing the images to include splashes of color and color overlays to punch up the black and white photographs. The end result was incredible – which added more colorful layers to the space + created instant conversation pieces. People touring the space immediately wanted to know about the history behind each print.”

Above: Andrew Webb, Lead Stylist – west elm Greensboro, NC


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Shannon

April 20, 2018

This is awesome! So inspired! Can you speak to how you addressed the furnace/heating unit challenge in the sitting area? Looks great!

erin

April 22, 2018

Wow! I just saw this house on an episode of Hoarders. Amazing transformation

Andrew

April 25, 2018

Hi Shannon – thank you for you taking the time to check out our project!

The radiator in the sitting area is original to the house, and was covered with a custom-built cover that included two metal screens to vent the heat. It’s a relatively simple design, just a 4-sided box with an open back that slips over the radiator. It was finished with a coat of glossy paint in Sherwin Williams’ Snowbound (SW 7004).

Hope that helps!

Joy Haverfield

May 7, 2018

Very Inspired!

April

September 16, 2018

What company sells those THICK, SMOOSHY, rugs like that colorful one w/turquoise, peach, tan, blue in a sitting area with the round tables and round chairs?

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